European Style Kitchen Remodeling

European Style Kitchen Remodeling

If you are planning on a home improvement project, kitchen remodeling is a great option that will not only boost resale value but also enhance the quality of living for your family. When it comes to trends, a classic design choice for many homeowners is European Style. This article discusses important points you need to know to implement European style kitchen remodeling and enjoy the perks of project success.

European style kitchen remodeling still comes in a wide range of variations from Greek, English Beaux, Classic Revival, Romantic French, Danish Modern, Italian, Scandinavian, and Tuscan Provencal. Your design choice should not only satisfy your personal taste and preference but also complement with the overall look of the house. To achieve the Euro look and feel and important character to focus on is the welcoming touch and architecture that showcase stylistic integrity.

When renovating the heart of homes, the easiest way to infuse European style is through choosing cabinets that matches the design. Being one of the most visually dominant features of kitchens, your cabinetry collection can create the ambiance you want out of the room. Below are some of the Euro-inspired design favorites and key features to achieve the look:

Tuscan

Tuscan Kitchens are rustic and often depict the colors of beaches and lush countryside vistas. Common colors include deep rusty reds, oranges, terra cotta, yellow umber, various shades of pink and peach and of course, green. Spruce up the walls with Tuscan art which may be authentic or tasteful photographic prints, colorful tiles for backsplash, and/or wall mural. Furniture and cabinets are often finished unpainted with ideal wood glaze ranging from deep browns to rich honey hues. But if you choose to have your cabinets painted, beautiful color choices include: vanilla, white, cream, dark green or dark blue.

Modern Euro

Another popular European style kitchen remodeling is the modern Euro design that is heavily inspired with Italian fashion. Cabinets commonly sport horizontal graining and frameless construction. Finish range from rich honey to cherry satin with glass door options and metal hardware. The character to achieve in this set up is refined versatility which can effectively be implemented by choosing Shaker style cabinets. Plain colors like black, grey and other neutrals are dominant with white as the most popular. Another trend in Modern Euro is sustainability not only in renovation materials but also in lighting and plumbing fixtures.

French Country

To introduce a French Country feel to your European style kitchen remodeling, a touch of comfort and practicality is essential. This character in the design makes this a popular option for many homeowners. Colors play an important role in achieving the French Country feeling, with schemes commonly in naturals. Cabinets with natural, distressed or weathered, dark stain, and white finishes are perfect for the set-up. And ornate moldings and glass doors complete the look. Other materials to consider that will add texture into the design include bricks, natural stone, terra cotta tiles, and thick wooden furniture.

Realize the kitchen of your dreams with our premium line of RTA kitchen cabinets and stylish Stainless Steel Sinks. Looking for an elegant European style collection for your kitchen remodeling project? Check out the Classic Rope series from the Craftsmen Network store.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Eugene_M_Makeev/1155701

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The Georgian House Plans Style

The Georgian House Plans Style

The Georgian style home is best described as being orderly and symmetrical, with a rectangular shape and formally symmetrical exteriors and interiors. Based upon the classical symmetry of the Renaissance, Georgian house plans became quite the rage in the New England and Southern colonies during the 18th century. The style has roots in both the classical architectural styles of ancient Greece and Rome and also the Italian renaissance style. English settlers in America were inspired by the elaborate Georgian style homes which were being built in the mother country, and tried to reproduce the lifestyle of the wealthy nobility back home. It became the dominant architectural style throughout the American colonies in the 18th century. While colonial homes in the Georgian style can be found in practically every old community on the U.S. East Coast, still Colonial Williamsburg is the most notable example (particularly the College of William and Mary’s President’s house, a stately brick mansion with perfect balance, symmetry and formality, which was finished in 1733 and has been home to all of the presidents of that university for three centuries).

In the southern colonies Georgian homes were constructed of brick; but as you move northward toward New England (where brick was not as common) wood frame construction dominates. These European home plans look quite formal: they are square and symmetrical in shape, with both exteriors and interiors arranged according to a strict proportion and symmetry. From the centrally-located front entrance, a hallway and staircase form an axis around which interior rooms are positioned. Often these homes have two chimneys above a medium pitch, side-gabled roof with pedimented dormers and dentil (tooth-like blocks) decorating the roof line along the eaves and a centered front door with pilasters – the flat, shallow columns found in Greek architecture – on each side. The central door is flanked by evenly-spaced double-hung windows; and they are invariably of two stories (one story homes in this style are referred to as Cape Cod style). There are traditionally five rectangular, evenly spaced windows across the facade of these homes. The windows are multi-paned, with nine or twelve panes in each sash and they have louvered shutters (particularly in the South) which welcome the breeze but provide shade from the sun. In the North paneled shutters are more common, to close tightly to protect the home from the harsh winds, snow, and sleet.

In considering building with Georgian country style house plans, it should be remembered that both brick and wood construction require maintenance. Wood clapboard which is not encased in vinyl siding always requires periodic painting or staining. Exteriors of masonry need much less maintenance, only requiring occasional tuck pointing. The multi-paned windows characteristic of this style are not particularly energy efficient. They must fit tightly and need to be reglazed now and then to keep the putty soft so that it seals well. The wood shake and slate roofs used in original Georgian style buildings were actually sounder than the asphalt shingles available today but all roofs require inspection and maintenance – even shake and slate.

Of all the European home plans brought by settlers to America, Georgian house plans are most typically “colonial American”. These formal, symmetrical country style house plans have always bespoken wealth for the leisure class.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Alice_Lane/108621

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Selecting House Plans: Popular Architectural Styles

Selecting House Plans: Popular Architectural Styles

American homes borrow styles from across the globe. Certain architectural themes, such as Cape Cod and ranch styles, were born in the U.S. Foreign lands inspired other styles, such as European, Mediterranean and Victorian. In this way, America is a melting pot of architectural styles. Whether you’re better suited to a ranch single-story or a bungalow Craftsman, home plans are available in a cornucopia of styles. Below, we’ve listed eight popular home styles to help you find the best theme for your family.

1. European. Anything from the European continent would fall under this category of home styles, including Spanish home plans as well as French Country, Georgian and Italianate homes. Overall, European styles feature stucco, stone or brick exteriors. Different European characteristics may be combined in a single plan. For instance, Italian windows can compliment vaulted arches from Norman France. Spanish home plans, in contrast, often feature low-pitched clay tile roofs and terracotta decoration.

2. Colonial. In America, the colonial period ran from the 1600s through 1800s. Many different home themes fall within that date range. For example, you may find homes described as Dutch Colonial, Spanish Colonial, German Colonial or French Colonial. Country-specific variations add color to the general colonial style. Dutch homes, for instance, were customarily constructed with brick and stone, so U.S. Dutch Colonials often feature these materials too. Colonial Spanish home plans, in contrast, may showcase interior courtyards. In spite of these country-specific variations, all colonial homes share a few basic traits, including an overall rectangular shape, chimneys on both ends of the house, large square rooms and barn or gambrel roofs.

3. Victorian. America and Britain were enamored with the Victorian style from 1825 to 1900. Victorian house plans’ most noticeable feature is their ornamentation, including bright exterior paint patterns, corbels and gable trim. Victorian house plans often feature decorative railing, sweeping verandas and two-story turrets, as well.

4. Prairie school. Prairie school homes are designed to blend in with the surrounding landscape. Here are a few common characteristics of a home designed in the Prairie School style:

– An indoor/outdoor approach.
– Rows of square windows.
– Low, long lines.
– Overhanging eaves.
– Little ornamentation; prairie school homes are simple and sleek.

5. Coastal. The beach lifestyle fuels coastal home designs. Raised foundations, rows of expansive windows and wraparound porches are common in coastal homes

6. Craftsman. Exposed roof rafters, decorative wood trim, sweeping porches and low-pitched gabled roofs are typical features of Craftsman home plans. In case you’re wondering, the bungalow is a certain category of Craftsman; home plans for bungalows often include stone columns and pedestals, horizontal wood shingle siding and a lower gable hanging over the porch.

7. Cape Cod. Typical Cape Cod features – single story designs, a central chimney and steep roofs – were intended to make life easier during harsh New England winters. (Steep roofs, for instance, allow snow to slide off, reducing the hazard of home collapse under heavy snowfall.) Today’s builders enhance the Cape Cod style with contemporary elements, such as rear garages and dormer windows.

By appreciating these stylistic differences, you can select the best home plans for your family. Regardless of whether you choose Craftsman home plans or a more modern design, your house will add to the melting pot that is American architecture.

Always a classic, Craftsman home plans will help ensure that your home is always in style. Visit HousePlans.co to view their wide selection of both stock and customizable Craftsman house plans.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Digby/1216526

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